Japanese town with world record in snowmen

 
Japanese town with world record in snowmen
A small Japanese town has set a new world record in making snowmen, after winter storms brought tons of snow to the area.

More than 600 people helped set up 1585 snowmen, each of them at least 90 centimeters high, in just one hour. Thus they broke the previous Guinness world record.

- We have prepared for the event since last year, said a local official in Iiyama city, where 23 centimeters of snow fell in 24 hours.

Both young and old helped out, just using their own glove-clad hands. The previous record was set in the United States in 2011, but had 306 fewer snowmen.

- It was difficult because the snow crumbled, but I had fun, says eight year old Ichika Oguchi according to Kyodo News.

- I am very glad that we managed to set a record.

In addition to the minimum requirement for heightm Guinness also requires that each snowman must have features and arms.

There has been much snow in large parts of northern Japan this winter. Somewhere in Hokkaido it fell 180 centimeters of snow in just one day earlier this month.

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