Shock report: Glyphosate in German beer

 
Shock report: Glyphosate in German beer
Shock report: Glyphosate in German beer

14 known German beer brands show disturbing remnants of the world's most widely used pesticides in agriculture, glyphosate.

The sensational information comes from the environmental organization, Environmental Institute in Munich (Munich UMWELTINSTITUT E.W.) and comes two months before Germany plans to celebrate the 500th anniversary of the Bavarian purity law for beer.

It states that the ingredients in beer may only be water, malt and humulus. Now it turns out that the American company Monsanto also contributes with its controversial pesticide glyphosate, which in some countries is known under the brand RoundUp.

- Glyphosate does not belong in beer, writes the Environment Institute on its website, adding that the World Health Organization believes pesticides may be carcinogenic to humans.

The danger of cancer emerges from an article UN researchers published in the journal The Lancet.

The highest level of pesticides found, was 29.74 micrograms in a brew from the world's largest brewery company, Anheuser-Busch InBev.

It is nearly 300 times more than the allowable limit of 0.1 micrograms in water.

Breweries, the German farmers' organization DBV and the German Federal Institute for Risk analysis, BfR, rejects that the findings of glyphosate in beer involve any health risk, reports the broadcaster DW.

- An adult must drink about 1000 liters of beer a day to digest sufficient quantities that it becomes a health hazard, says the risk analysis institute BfR.

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