Taylor Swift video accused of racism

Taylor Swift video accused of racism
In her new video, "Wildest Dreams", Taylor Swift was inspired by films like "The African Queen" and "Out of Africa".

The video features a love story from the 1950s, and it was recorded in Africa (the country is not specified). Swift's flame is Scott Eastwood (yes, son of Clint), and it looks very romantic.

Now several criticizes the video for being racist, writes CNN.

The reason is that virtually all actors and extras are white. Or as The Daily Dot writes: "It is about as white as a farmer's market on Sunday morning."

Viviane Rutabingwa from Kenya and James Kassaga Arinaitwe from Uganda reacted strongly to the video.

- We are shocked that in 2015, Taylor Swift recorded the video, and her producers meant that it was ok to shoot a video that presents a glamorous version of the white fantasy of the colonial period in Africa, they write on NPR.org.

- For us, coming from the continent who had parents or grandparents who lived in colonial times, this nostalgia privileged white people for the colonial period in Africa confusing, to say the least, or offensive, they write.

Video director Joseph Khan, disagrees with the critics opinions.

- The concept of the music video was that they had a relationship at a place far away from the normal life. This is not a video about the colonial era, but a love story on the set of a film in Africa in 1950, he tells the Daily Mail.

When black rap artists make a video featuring only black people, there are never any complaints about racism. Ever. Why is it that black people can't stand not being involved?

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